Exxon Valdez Spill – 25 Years Later Effects Linger

Alaskan Beaches 3 Days After Exxon Valdez SpillMonday is the 25th Anniversary of the  Exxon Valdez Oil Spill and I found an article about how some things still aren’t and probably will never be “as good as ever.”

It’s almost 4 years since the 2014 BP Deep Water Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

I know there are lots of good people doing lots of good things, but often I wish BP’s public relations staff would give it a rest. BP and others Screwed UP. VERY BADLY. What BP does now doesn’t change the fact that, as with the Exxon Valdez spill, some things will never completely recover, at least not in our life times.

You think Mother Nature screwed up this winter? It’s nothing compared to greedy corporations, people willing to look the other way for cheap fuel, and overworked rig workers, truckers or even boat captains. Accidents happen. 

With the missing Malaysian airliner, Crimea/Russian/Ukraine, and so many other things going on, there’s a chance that the 25th anniversary of Exxon Valdez may not get the attention it deserves. And speaking of Russia, who do you think is sitting on the World’s biggest supply of untapped oil.  The United States cannot afford to not invest in alternative renewable energy TODAY!

For many people, wildlife, businesses and the environment, things will never be the same in Alaska or the Gulf.

Precautions were taken after Exxon Valdez and many really believed it was “virtually impossible” for something that bad to happen again.

So Much For The Best Laid Plansdead and dying oil covered birdsDrill Baby Drill? I think not.

santayana_quoteWhat About Fracking?

I’m no scientist, but watch this video. It shouldn’t take an Einstein to realize something is horribly wrong.

With this in mind, here’s an article I stumbled across today while going through the news. I sure hope that a lot more news outlets will cover the Exxon Valdez big picture on the 25th Anniversary next week.

What Can You Do?

We all like our energy to be as cheap as possible. No doubt about it.  But sooner or later, we all pay the piper.

No matter what techniques are used and how careful or careless we may be extracting fossil fuels, these two facts are clear

  1.  Sooner or later we are going to run out of fossil fuels, and for many of us it will be in our lifetime
  2. Accidents will happen. They always do.

Fossil fuels are vital to the average US citizen, and certainly to our economy and our security. But, they need to be extracted and used with care. And now is the time, my friends to get a better grip on renewable energy sources such as solar and wind.

Like it or not, government subsidies are necessary to grow these industries. (If they weren’t necessary AND these energies weren’t via viable, would companies like Exxon or BP accepting money to invest in renewable energy? Because God Knows They Get the Lion’s Share.)

What you can do is contact your US Senators and Congressional Representative, as well as your state and local politicians to let them know what you think and how you vote.

Not only is it quick and easy to send them an email or make a call, private citizens can join together and be a powerful voting bloc. Remember: politicians know that if you care enough to contact them, odds are you vote.

How to Contact Your US Representatives

Here is the link to find the phone or email addresses for your US congressional rep: http://www.house.gov/representatives/

Here is the link to contact your two Senators: http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm

Read the Short MSN Article on Exxon Valdez 25 Years Later and Hope More Is Planned by Other Media Next Week

25 years later, Exxon Valdez spill effects linger

25 years of Exxon Valdez: Crude oil from the tanker Exxon Valdez, top, swirls on the surface of Alaska's Prince William Sound near Naked Island on April 9, 1989: Crude oil from the tanker Exxon Valdez, top, swirls on the surface of Alaska's Prince William Sound near Naked Island on April 9, 1989. The 987-foot tanker, carrying 53 million gallons of crude, struck Bligh Reef at 12:04 a.m. on March 24, 1989, and within hours unleashed an estimated 10.8 million gallons of thick, toxic crude oil into the water.

Crude oil from the tanker Exxon Valdez, top, swirls on the surface of Alaska’s Prince William Sound near Naked Island on April 9, 1989. The 987-foot tanker, carrying 53 million gallons of crude, struck Bligh Reef at 12:04 a.m. on March 24, 1989, and within hours unleashed an estimated 10.8 million gallons of thick, toxic crude oil into the water.

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Before the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico, there was the Exxon Valdez disaster in Alaska, at the time the nation’s largest oil spill.

The 987-foot tanker, carrying 53 million gallons of crude, struck Bligh Reef at 12:04 a.m. on March 24, 1989. Within hours, it unleashed an estimated 10.8 million gallons of thick, toxic crude oil into the water. Storms and currents then smeared it over 1,300 miles of shoreline.

For a generation of people around the world, the spill was seared into their memories by images of fouled coastline in Prince William Sound, of sea otters, herring and birds soaked in oil, of workers painstakingly washing crude off the rugged beaches.

Twenty five years later…read the rest of the article

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